KMi Seminars
Grassroots initiated networked communities: a viable method of overcoming multiple digital inequalities within communities of locality?
This event took place on Monday 19 April 2004 at 12:30

 
Mark Gaved

The UK government seeks to overcome the 'digital divide', and offering "internet access for all who want it" by 2005. It is unlikely, however, that this will be achieved through government funded interventions focussing primarily on achieving physical access to the internet. My research considers that a possible solution may be found in the emerging phenomenon of grassroots initiated networked communities. These are communities of locality that have developed their own internet and/or intranet infrastructure with minimal external support.

The first year of research was chiefly concerned with investigating issues surrounding the digital divide, technology adoption and sustainability. The initial findings will be presented, and the second year research introduced. In my second year I will be focussing on social software; considering whether web based collaborative tools can support the sustained development of networked communities.

Download PowerPoint Presentation (1Mb ZIP file)

 
KMi Seminars
KMi 2013 - A review of the year

Download the KMi 2013 Review of the year iBook to your iOS device or alternatively as a PDF.

Journal | 25 years of knowledge acquisition
 

Knowledge Management is...


Knowledge Management
Creating learning organisations hinges on managing knowledge at many levels. Knowledge can be provided by individuals or it can be created as a collective effort of a group working together towards a common goal, it can be situated as "war stories" or it can be generalised as guidelines, it can be described informally as comments in a natural language, pictures and technical drawings or it can be formalised as mathematical formulae and rules, it can be expressed explicitly or it can be tacit, embedded in the work product. The recipient of knowledge - the learner - can be an individual or a work group, professionals, university students, schoolchildren or informal communities of interest.
Our aim is to capture, analyse and organise knowledge, regardless of its origin and form and make it available to the learner when needed presented with the necessary context and in a form supporting the learning processes.