KMi Seminars
Placename Disambiguation with Co-occurrence Models
This event took place on Wednesday 06 December 2006 at 11:30

 
Simon Overell Imperial College London, and KMi, The Open University

My talk will cover an introduction to Geographic Information Retrieval (GIR) and the advantages provided by indexing placenames as unambiguous locations. I will describe our GIR system which generates a large-scale co-occurrence model and applies this model to the problem of placename disambiguation. The data for the model is mined from Wikipedia and applied to the GeoCLEF corpus. An example of placename disambiguation could be when "London" is referred to in text, is it "London, UK" or "London, Ontario"? The motivation behind this problem is to make un-annotated data machine readable and allow users to query and browse data geographically. The talk will begin with a description of GIR, placename disambiguation techniques and the use of Wikipedia as a corpus. Then a description of my probabilistic models, using first and higher orders of co-occurrence. The talk will conclude with our findings on how Information Retrieval methods can be enhanced with Geographic
Knowledge.

 
KMi Seminars
KMi 2013 - A review of the year

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Journal | 25 years of knowledge acquisition
 

Future Internet is...


Future Internet
With over a billion users, today's Internet is arguably the most successful human artifact ever created. The Internet's physical infrastructure, software, and content now play an integral part of the lives of everyone on the planet, whether they interact with it directly or not. Now nearing its fifth decade, the Internet has shown remarkable resilience and flexibility in the face of ever increasing numbers of users, data volume, and changing usage patterns, but faces growing challenges in meetings the needs of our knowledge society. Globally, many major initiatives are underway to address the need for more scientific research, physical infrastructure investment, better education, and better utilisation of the Internet. Within Japan, USA and Europe major new initiatives have begun in the area.

To succeed the Future Internet will need to address a number of cross-cutting challenges including:

  • Scalability in the face of peer-to-peer traffic, decentralisation, and increased openness

  • Trust when government, medical, financial, personal data are increasingly trusted to the cloud, and middleware will increasingly use dynamic service selection

  • Interoperability of semantic data and metadata, and of services which will be dynamically orchestrated

  • Pervasive usability for users of mobile devices, different languages, cultures and physical abilities

  • Mobility for users who expect a seamless experience across spaces, devices, and velocities